Sunday, January 22, 2017

Blue Skies and Beaches


 The sun is out. The sun is out!

 Ten o'clock this morning I left Castlette DeVice is a blaze of winter sunshine. Unlike most daydrifts I undertake, I had already decided where I was going to walk before I left the house castlette: along the beach to West Runton (last walked here - for the first time).
 Now, you might find some of these photos somewhat repetitive in nature, but my incredible indecisiveness kicked in with a vengeance making choosing between them more difficult than a life or death decision.

Leaving Cromer Pier behind me

Landscapes in the black mirror are closer than they appear...

A bijou beach residence for when you want to get away from it all!


Cromer Pier from East Runton beach

And a bit further on...

... it could almost be summer!

Ripples in the sand

Those ripples from a worms-eye view

Looking towards West Runton beach - the most dangerous beach in the world!

Despite the danger of being poked by old-timey assimilation tubules, I kept going

Just making sure Cromer Pier is still there...

... just.

This is as far as I ventured - the edge of West Runton

The tide's coming in now...

... which means staying in the sun on the sand...

... is more difficult as the beach is breached...

... by the incoming sea

These oystercatchers don't seem to mind, though


Back in Cromer having watched the lifeboat come in - you can see the prow peeking out of the end of the pier.

The view towards Overstrand from the pier

Looks like a bit of salty spray got on the lens...

::

 I have a couple more sets of photographs from this daydrift that I'll publish another day to spare your scrolling fingers from being worn down to nubbins: some snaps of various geological features in the cliffs, and a few of the Lester - Cromer's lifeboat.

 And as I construct this post, the sun is still out!

13 comments:

  1. We should send this to all those silly climate denialists!
    My local patch of sky is still fuzzy-grey at 6am, but already hot.So I really enjoyed strolling along the ripply sands with my first coffee.(Sweetie, I don't go anywhere before I've had my coffee!)Thank you

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    1. If you come to visit, we could have our second cup of coffee at Coasta Coffee and say hello to LẌ as he froths the top of our lattes!

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  2. I was down by two different beaches yesterday, both as grey as sheet metal.

    I love that little half-buried remains. Archaeology and cottaging combined, how clever.

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    1. The Gays down have made archeology a cottage industry, Peenee!

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  3. I'm guessing this isn't the first time "salty spray" got on your lens.

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    1. You'd guess right. Many's the time I've had to rub off the end!

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  4. Lovely shots... Nice tidal return... almost in time lapse... Do your life boat jockeys wear speedos like the ones we have downunder? If so I'd love to do a comparitive arse study...

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    1. Ha! You should be so lucky. If our lifeboat men wore Speedos they'd die of hypothermia. And that's in the middle of summer!

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  5. Is that nuclear waste the oystercatchers are subsisting on? It certainly seems to be glowing.

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    1. I think you may be on to something, Hound. Although, this pair are only 15 feet tall - small for the size 'round here - so perhaps that's not nuclear waste after all?

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  6. Gorgeous here today as well... but we are all suffering from high pollution or something... you're probably okay by the coast, but I noticed it here... in the middle of nowhere.
    Sx

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    1. Pollution?! May be it's that nuclear waste Hound was talking about.
      How tall are your oystercatchers?

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  7. Fantastic fotos of the beach from all angles! The intriguing oystercatcher has the right idea! I'd've been tempted to hunt for oysters before the tide came in.

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